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Rosaura Conley-Estrada

Contact Information

Rosaura Conley-Estrada Portrait

Phone: 426-2813
Email: rconley-Estrada@boisestate.edu
Vita: Rosaura Conley-Estrada Vita Click Here
Office Location: River Front Hall 213-B
Office Hours:  On Sabbatical Fall 2017 and Spring 2018

Associate Professor

Rosaura Conley-Estrada, BA Sociology and Political Science, Master’s in Demography and Social Analysis, and Ph.D. in Sociology from the University of California, Irvine, joined the sociology department in Boise State University in 2009.  Her scholarly areas of interest are immigrant adaptation and incorporation, gendered selective acculturation processes, and the intersection of race/ethnicity, gender, education, and employment dynamics.  Specifically, her work examines changing gender roles across generations as a key lens for shedding light on economic and socio-cultural incorporation processes among Mexican immigrants and their descendants. Specifically, she examines how shifting patterns of gender dynamics in husband-wife relationships across multi-generations of the U.S. Mexican origin population in combination with growing employment opportunities in the United States for women affect educational outcomes for these generations of men and women. Tafoya-Estrada’s research focuses on the ways education is not only an investment for better jobs, and higher earnings, but also greater gender equity.

Her recent work includes:

2010.  “Immigration and Black/Latino Labor Market Dynamics: Paradoxes and Policy Implications,” in Black-Latino Inter-relations in the 21st Century, Eduardo Telles and Michael Dawson (eds.), Russell Sage Foundation Press (with Frank D. Bean, James Bachmeier, and Susan K. Brown).

2008.The Annals of American Academy of Political and Social Science special issue on The New Second Generation. “Success Attained, Deterred, and Denied: Divergent Pathways to Social Mobility in Los Angeles’ New Second Generation.” (with Min Zhou, Jennifer Lee, Jody Agius and Yang Sao Xiang).

2006.  “Immigration and Incarceration: Patterns and Predictors of Imprisonment among First and Second-Generation Young Adults,” in Immigration and Crime:Ethnicity, Race, Violence, Martínez, R. and A. Valenzuela (eds.),  New York University Press  (with Rubén G. Rumbaut, Golnaz Komaie, Charlie V. Morgan, and Roberto Gonzalez).

Courses Taught:

  • Soc 101 Introduction to Sociology 
  • Soc 230 Multi-Ethnic Studies
  • Soc 312 Population Demography
  • Soc 332 Mexican-American Studies
  • Soc 498 Senior Seminar